Saturday, February 8, 2020

Final Term Paper Example | Topics and Well Written Essays - 1500 words

Final - Term Paper Example international market regions of Europe, it had to bear varied types of challenges and issues such as barriers in international trade, mitigation as well as investment (Beall, 2010). But due to the support of municipal government, all such international barriers reduced significantly that amplified its position and brand image in the entire globe among other rival players such as General Motors, Toyota etc. As a result of which the total sale and profitability of the organization enhanced that proved effective for the government of the Europe among other neighboring nations. The economic condition of the country enhanced as well as the rate o unemployment and poverty reduced to a significant extent (Ford.com, 2014). Other than this, at the time of expansion in the new market region of Europe, the organization of Ford Motors had to analyze the taste and preferences of the customers so as to improve its prosperity and portfolio in the market (Bradley, 2012). Moreover, due to the active participation of municipal government, the policy related issues such as tariff barriers, subsides to local firms etc reduced significantly that amplified its reputation and market share in the markets of Europe among others (Ford, 2014). The organization of Ford Motors had to bear varied types of political challenges such as tariff rates, trade restrictions due to political instability in the nation of Europe. As a result of which, the brand image and competitiveness of the organization of Ford Motors attained a serious set-back (Kazmi, 2010). Economic factors: inflation is one of the important causes that hindered the total sale and prosperity of the organization of Ford Motors within the region of Europe as compared to many others. As a result, the organization had failed to enhance its profit margin and demand of the products that hindered its portfolio and prosperity in the market among others. Social factors: as the preferences of the customers are changing at a rapid pace so

Wednesday, January 29, 2020

To His Coy Mistress Essay Example for Free

To His Coy Mistress Essay The poem is a deductive poem written by a much older person to the little mistress. The 46 line poem can be said to be divided into three different parts where the author tries to make a point. The first part, lines 1- 20, introduces the limitation of time in for the poet to sing of the mistresses’ beauty and shyness. This is seen in line 1 where the poet says â€Å"Had we enough time† and â€Å"†¦an hundred years should go to praise†¦Thine eyes, and on thy forehead gaze†. Generally, the poem is an argument that follows procession of the poet’s thought. In the second part of the poem, lines 21-32, poet says that with the poet arguing that time is indeed short and unfavorable to lovers as they can not enjoy their love for long as â€Å"†¦time is winged† â€Å"†¦And you quaint honor turn to dust, And into ashes all my lust†. In the third part, lines 33-46, the poet draws a conclusion that due to the fact that life is short and time unlimited, they should throw away any care and tear their pleasure with rough strife. The tone of the poet used a flirty and seductive tone in conveying his message to his beloved mistress. The setting of the poem is in medieval times when it was socially unacceptable for ladies to express their desire for a man even though they are in love with him. They are to show some â€Å"coyness† at first so feign indifference to the romantic advances of men. He used seductive words like â€Å"†¦two hundred to adore each breast† (line 15), â€Å"†¦and your quaint honor turns to dust†¦ and into ashes all my lust† (lines 29 and 30). The poet uses rhyme scheme that follows the aa, bb, cc pattern. He also uses metaphorical expression in the poem. This can be seen in lines 11, 22, 35 and 36. In addition to this, the poet used imagery as a tool in the poem. This can be seen in lines 6, 12, 16, 24, 27, 29, 30, 36, 38, 39. He also used simile in lines 34 â€Å"†¦like morning dew†, and lines 38 â€Å"†¦like amorous birds of prey†. He also used allusion in line 11 where he said â€Å"†¦vegetable love†.

Tuesday, January 21, 2020

Review Of Platoon :: essays research papers

I wasn’t expecting it, I just looked up and there it was: the disgusting, bloody, mauled body of a dead soldier. The shot was brief and I do not remember if he was strung up on a tree, if he was hanging, or what not. I was not in class the day prior due to a sleepless night led to sickness, so I was not able to watch the first part of the movie. I remembered that our class was supposed to watch a war movie; Ms. Klein was deciding between â€Å"Born on the Fourth of July† and â€Å"Platoon†. I vaguely remember her saying something about one of the movies being a slight bit, well, gruesomely horrifying. Due to a number of things that were due in my classes that day, when I walked into my English room, I was not thinking about the warnings that I was given. Then I looked up. Shocked I guess you could say was my first reaction. I was a little too surprised to be disgusted. Don’t sound so disappointed, I became sick to my stomach all too soon. It was hard for me to concentrate on a lot of â€Å"Platoon† during the first day of class. I looked at the screen only half of the time; I buried my head in current work so as to hide my eyes from the disasters on TV. I would occasionally look up and sure enough, each time I proceeded to lift my head, I squealed, and put it back down. I remember scenes of teenage boys being tortures with bullets, old women and men being killed, girls being raped, and children being put in front of a firing squad. That night, I couldn’t control the terrible scenes that flooded my head as I tried to sleep. The next day, I had learned to deal with the violence a little more than the previous day. I watched almost all of it, having to turn away only occasionally. The emotions that the violence expressed held me taut; it no longer turned me away from the screen, but drew me in, showing me further the horrible nature of war. Even though director Oliver Stone may have exaggerated situations in the war, he presented Vietnam like no one before. War is not shown as an event worthy of glory or praise, we are no longer shown as a brave force of victims. Review Of Platoon :: essays research papers I wasn’t expecting it, I just looked up and there it was: the disgusting, bloody, mauled body of a dead soldier. The shot was brief and I do not remember if he was strung up on a tree, if he was hanging, or what not. I was not in class the day prior due to a sleepless night led to sickness, so I was not able to watch the first part of the movie. I remembered that our class was supposed to watch a war movie; Ms. Klein was deciding between â€Å"Born on the Fourth of July† and â€Å"Platoon†. I vaguely remember her saying something about one of the movies being a slight bit, well, gruesomely horrifying. Due to a number of things that were due in my classes that day, when I walked into my English room, I was not thinking about the warnings that I was given. Then I looked up. Shocked I guess you could say was my first reaction. I was a little too surprised to be disgusted. Don’t sound so disappointed, I became sick to my stomach all too soon. It was hard for me to concentrate on a lot of â€Å"Platoon† during the first day of class. I looked at the screen only half of the time; I buried my head in current work so as to hide my eyes from the disasters on TV. I would occasionally look up and sure enough, each time I proceeded to lift my head, I squealed, and put it back down. I remember scenes of teenage boys being tortures with bullets, old women and men being killed, girls being raped, and children being put in front of a firing squad. That night, I couldn’t control the terrible scenes that flooded my head as I tried to sleep. The next day, I had learned to deal with the violence a little more than the previous day. I watched almost all of it, having to turn away only occasionally. The emotions that the violence expressed held me taut; it no longer turned me away from the screen, but drew me in, showing me further the horrible nature of war. Even though director Oliver Stone may have exaggerated situations in the war, he presented Vietnam like no one before. War is not shown as an event worthy of glory or praise, we are no longer shown as a brave force of victims.

Monday, January 13, 2020

Simple Des

William Stallings Copyright 2006 Supplement to Cryptography and Network Security, Fourth Edition Prentice Hall 2006 ISBN: 0-13-187316-4 http://williamstallings. com/Crypto/Crypto4e. html 8/5/05 Simplified DES, developed by Professor Edward Schaefer of Santa Clara University [SCHA96], is an educational rather than a secure encryption algorithm. It has similar properties and structure to DES with much smaller parameters. The reader might find it useful to work through an example by and while following the discussion in this Appendix. C. 1 Overview Figure C. 1 illustrates the overall structure of the simplified DES, which we will refer to as SDES. The S-DES encryption algorithm takes an 8-bit block of plaintext (example: 10111101) and a 10-bit key as input and produces an 8-bit block of ciphertext as output. The S-DES decryption algorithm takes an 8-bit block of ciphertext and the same 10-bit key used to produce that ciphertext as input and produces the original 8-bit block of plaintext .The encryption algorithm involves five functions: an initial permutation (IP); a complex function labeled fK, which involves both permutation and substitution operations and depends on a key input; a simple permutation function that switches (SW) the two halves of the data; the function fK again; and finally a permutation function that is the inverse of the initial permutation (IP–1). As was mentioned in Chapter 2, the use of multiple stages of permutation and substitution results in a more complex algorithm, which increases the difficulty of cryptanalysis.The function fK takes as input not only the data passing through the encryption algorithm, but also an 8-bit key. The algorithm could have been designed to work with a 16-bit key, consisting of two 8-bit subkeys, one used for each occurrence of fK. Alternatively, a single 8-bit key could have been used, with the same key used twice in the algorithm. A compromise is to use a 10-bit key from which two 8-bit subkeys are gener ated, as depicted in Figure C. 1. In this case, the key is first subjected to a permutation (P10). Then a shift operation is performed.The output of the shift operation then passes through a permutation function that produces an 8-bit output (P8) for the first subkey (K1 ). The output of the shift operation also feeds into another shift and another instance of P8 to produce the second subkey (K 2 ). We can concisely express the encryption algorithm as a composition1 of functions: which can also be written as: IP-1 o fK2 o SW o fK1 o IP ((( ciphertext = IP-1 fK 2 SW fK1 (IP(plaintext )) where ( K1 = P8 Shift (P10(key )) ! ( ( ))) ) K2 = P8 Shift Shift( P10( key)) )) Decryption is also shown in Figure C. and is essentially the reverse of encryption: ((( plaintext = IP-1 fK1 SW fK 2 (IP(ciphertext )) 1 ))) Definition:! f f and g are two functions, then the function F with the equation y = F(x) = I g[f(x)] is called the composition of f and g and is denoted as F = g o f . C-2 8/5/05 We now examine the elements of S-DES in more detail. C. 2 S-DES Key Generation S-DES depends on the use of a 10-bit key shared between sender and receiver. From this key, two 8-bit subkeys are produced for use in particular stages of the encryption and decryption algorithm. Figure C. 2 depicts the stages followed to produce the subkeys.First, permute the key in the following fashion. Let the 10-bit key be designated as (k1 , k2 , k3 , k4 , k5 , k6 , k7 , k8 , k9 , k10). Then the permutation P10 is defined as: P10(k1 , k2 , k3 , k4 , k5 , k6 , k7 , k8 , k9 , k10) = (k3 , k5 , k2 , k7 , k4 , k10, k1 , k9 , k8 , k6 ) P10 can be concisely defined by the display: 3 5 2 7 P10 4 10 1 9 8 6 This table is read from left to right; each position in the table gives the identity of the input bit that produces the output bit in that position. So the first output bit is bit 3 of the input; the second output bit is bit 5 of the input, and so on.For example, the key (1010000010) is permuted to (1000001 100). Next, perform a circular left shift (LS-1), or rotation, separately on the first five bits and the second five bits. In our example, the result is (00001 11000). Next we apply P8, which picks out and permutes 8 of the 10 bits according to the following rule: P8 6 3 7 4 8 5 10 9 The result is subkey 1 (K1 ). In our example, this yields (10100100) We then go back to the pair of 5-bit strings produced by the two LS-1 functions and perform a circular left shift of 2 bit positions on each string. In our example, the value (00001 11000) becomes (00100 00011).Finally, P8 is applied again to produce K2 . In our example, the result is (01000011). C. 3 S-DES Encryption Figure C. 3 shows the S-DES encryption algorithm in greater detail. As was mentioned, encryption involves the sequential application of five functions. We examine each of these. Initial and Final Permutations The input to the algorithm is an 8-bit block of plaintext, which we first permute using the IP function: IP 2 6 3 1 4 8 5 7 This retains all 8 bits of the plaintext but mixes them up. At the end of the algorithm, the inverse permutation is used: C-3 8/5/05 1 3 IP–1 57 2 8 6 It is easy to show by example that the second permutation is indeed the reverse of the first; that is, IP–1(IP(X)) = X. The Function fK The most complex component of S-DES is the function fK, which consists of a combination of permutation and substitution functions.The functions can be expressed as follows. Let L and R be the leftmost 4 bits and rightmost 4 bits of the 8-bit input to fK, and let F be a mapping (not necessarily one to one) from 4-bit strings to 4-bit strings. Then we let fK(L, R) = (L ! F(R, SK), R) where SK is a subkey and ! s the bit-by-bit exclusive-OR function. For example, suppose the output of the IP stage in Figure C. 3 is (10111101) and F(1101, SK) = (1110) for some key SK. Then fK(10111101) = (01011101) because (1011) ! (1110) = (0101). We now describe the mapping F. The input is a 4-bi t number (n 1 n2 n3 n4 ). The first operation is an expansion/permutation operation: 4 1 2 E/P 32 3 4 1 For what follows, it is clearer to depict the result in this fashion: n4 n2 n1 n3 n2 n4 n3 n1 The 8-bit subkey K1 = (k11, k12, k13, k14, k15, k16, k17, k18) is added to this value using exclusiveOR: n4 ! 11 n2 ! k15 n1 ! k12 n3 ! k16 n2 ! k13 n4 ! k17 n3 ! k14 n1 ! k18 p0,1 p1,1 p0,2 p1,2 p0,3 p1,3 Let us rename these 8 bits: p0,0 p1,0 The first 4 bits (first row of the preceding matrix) are fed into the S-box S0 to produce a 2bit output, and the remaining 4 bits (second row) are fed into S1 to produce another 2-bit output. These two boxes are defined as follows: C-4 8/5/05 0 S0 = 1 2 3 0 â€Å"1 $3 $0 $3 # 1 0 2 2 1 2 3 1 1 3 3 2% 0†² 3†² 2†² ; 0 S1 = 1 2 3 0 â€Å"0 $2 $3 $2 # 1 1 0 0 1 23 2 3% 1 3†² 1 0†² 0 3†² & The S-boxes operate as follows.The first and fourth input bits are treated as a 2-bit number that specify a row of the S-box, and the s econd and third input bits specify a column of the Sbox. The entry in that row and column, in base 2, is the 2-bit output. For example, if (p0,0p0,3) = ! (00) and (p0,1p0,2) = (10), then the output is from row 0, column 2 of S0, which is 3, or (11) in binary. Similarly, (p1,0p1,3) and (p1,1p1,2) are used to index into a row and column of S1 to produce an additional 2 bits. Next, the 4 bits produced by S0 and S1 undergo a further permutation as follows: P4 2 4 3 1 The output of P4 is the output of the function F.The Switch Function The function fK only alters the leftmost 4 bits of the input. The switch function (SW) interchanges the left and right 4 bits so that the second instance of f K operates on a different 4 bits. In this second instance, the E/P, S0, S1, and P4 functions are the same. The key input is K2 . C. 4 Analysis of Simplified DES A brute-force attack on simplified DES is certainly feasible. With a 10-bit key, there are only 2 10 = 1024 possibilities. Given a ciphertex t, an attacker can try each possibility and analyze the result to determine if it is reasonable plaintext. What about cryptanalysis?Let us consider a known plaintext attack in which a single plaintext (p1 , p2 , p3 , p4 , p5 , p6 , p7 , p8 ) and its ciphertext output (c1 , c2 , c3 , c4 , c5 , c6 , c7 , c8 ) are known and the key (k1 , k2 , k3 , k4 , k5 , k6 , k7 , k8 , k9 , k10) is unknown. Then each ci is a polynomial function gi of the pj ‘s and kj ‘s. We can therefore express the encryption algorithm as 8 nonlinear equations in 10 unknowns. There are a number of possible solutions, but each of these could be calculated and then analyzed. Each of the permutations and additions in the algorithm is a linear mapping.The nonlinearity comes from the S-boxes. It is useful to write down the equations for these boxes. For clarity, rename (p0,0, p0,1,p0,2, p0,3) = (a, b, c, d) and (p1,0, p1,1,p1,2, p1,3) = (w, x, y, z), and let the 4-bit output be (q, r , s, t) Then the operati on of the S0 is defined by the following equations: q = abcd + ab + ac + b + d r = abcd + abd + ab + ac + ad + a + c + 1 where all additions are modulo 2. Similar equations define S1. Alternating linear maps with these nonlinear maps results in very complex polynomial expressions for the ciphertext bits, making cryptanalysis difficult.To visualize the scale of the problem, note that a polynomial equation in 10 unknowns in binary arithmetic can have 210 possible terms. On average, we might therefore C-5 8/5/05 expect each of the 8 equations to have 29 terms. The interested reader might try to find these equations with a symbolic processor. Either the reader or the software will give up before much progress is made. C. 5 Relationship to DES DES operates on 64-bit blocks of input. The encryption scheme can be defined as: IP-1 o fK16 o SW o fK15 o SW oL o SW o f K1 o IPA 56-bit key is used, from which sixteen 48-bit subkeys are calculated. There is an initial permutation of 64 bits foll owed by a sequence of shifts and permutations of 48 bits. Within the encryption algorithm, instead of F acting on 4 bits (n1 n2 n3 n4 ), it acts on 32 bits (n1 †¦n32). After the initial expansion/permutation, the output of 48 bits can be diagrammed as: n32 n4 †¢ †¢ †¢ n28 n1 n5 n29 n2 n6 †¢ †¢ †¢ n30 n3 n7 n4 n8 n31 n32 n5 n9 †¢ †¢ †¢ n1 This matrix is added (exclusive-OR) to a 48-bit subkey. There are 8 rows, corresponding to 8 S-boxes. Each S-box has 4 rows and 16 columns.The first and last bit of a row of the preceding matrix picks out a row of an S-box, and the middle 4 bits pick out a column. C-6 10-bit key ENCRYPTION DECRYPTION P10 8-bit plaintext 8-bit plaintext Shift IP-1 IP K1 fK P8 K1 fK Shift SW SW K2 fK P8 K2 fK IP–1 IP 8-bit ciphertext 8-bit ciphertext Figure C. 1 Simplified DES Scheme 10-bit key 10 P10 5 5 LS-1 LS-1 5 5 P8 K1 8 LS-2 LS-2 5 5 P8 K2 8 Figure C. 2 Key Generation for Simplified DES 8-bit plaintext 8 IP 4 fK 4 E/P 8 F 8 + 4 4 2 K1 2 S0 S1 P4 4 + 4 SW 4 fK 4 E/P 8 F 8 + 4 4 2 K2 2 S0 S1 P4 4 + 4 IP–1 8 8-bit ciphertext Figure C. 3 Simplified DES Encryption Detail

Sunday, January 5, 2020

The Impact of the Great Awakening on the Ideological...

Elaborate on the Great Awakening. How did the movement impact the ideological development of the colonies? The colonies were founded in the spirit of a relatively rigid conception of divine election. According to the Calvinist notion which dominated at the time, God had already chosen whom he would save and it was incumbent upon the elect to demonstrate their fitness for heaven upon earth. Gradually, over the course of the 18th century, the rationalist ideas of the Enlightenment that had become common currency in Europe began to permeate America. Religious zeal began to wane, and a more secular approach to life and education was adopted in urban locations and at elite institutions like Harvard and Yale. However, in rural areas of America there was profound resistance to this notion, and the Great Awakening was a response to the perceived negative influence of this secularization (Faragher et al 2009: 120). Preachers like Jonathan Edwards used fire metaphors to counterbalance what many felt was the new spiritual coldness of the rationalist era (Faragher et al 2009: 120). George Whitefield was one of the most influential speakers of the era, and promised an egalitarian salvation for all, regardless of denomination, so long as there was an acceptance of the divine in the listeners heart. This spilt between the secular and the urban and the rural and the religious parallels many of the current red and blue divisions of our own era, in which the social worldview ofShow MoreRelatedWhy Nova Scotia Failed to Join the American Revolution2306 Words   |  10 Pagesgeographic, as well as religious factors that led to Nova Scotians’ lack of attachment to revolutionary ideology in the colonies. During the time of the American Revolution, Nova Scotia was geographically on the northeastern frontier of Massachusetts. 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Saturday, December 28, 2019

Psychoactive Substances Should Be Regulated Essay

Society’s taste for psychoactive substances is attested to in the earliest human records. Drug use and abuse is as old as mankind; humans have always had an inclination towards ingesting substances that make them feel stimulated, relaxed, or euphoric. In the past, the general population has used psychoactive substances for religious and ceremonial, medicinal and recreational purposes in a socially approved way. Our forbearers refined more potent compounds and devised faster routes of administration, which made these drugs easier to consume, which began the social stigmatization attached to varying substances. The complex causation of psychoactive substance use is reflected in the frequent pendulum swings between opposing attitudes on issues that are constantly being debated. Some examples are: is substance abuse a sin or a disease? Is addiction caused by the substance, the individual s vulnerability and psychology, or social factors? Which substances should be regulated and w hich should be freely available? Why are some drugs normalized while others are deemed unacceptable? Some substances were shut out of Western society because their production and consumption served only recreational purposes that did not align with Protestant ethic values, and did not contribute to the further development of the economy. Meanwhile other drugs, mainly coffee became a necessary staple in Western society’s daily life. There are several reasons why society has come to accept caffeine (inShow MoreRelatedReaction Paper On Limitless1592 Words   |  7 Pagesthe movie Eddie comes across a substance called â€Å"NZT†. This substance turned out to be a drug that could unleash his untapped cognitive potential. Within one day of taking the pill he was able to complete the stalled book and create his formula which later allowed him to become an enigma on Wall Street. 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The majority of states have expanded legalized gaming, including regulated casino-style games and lotteries, there has been a huge increase in the opening of Native American casinos and among other things, online gambling and betting has become increasingly more popular (Humphrey). While at first glance, this may seem to be a good thing, it is imperative that oneRead MoreEssay On Caffeine1241 Words   |  5 Pagesdrowsiness, headaches, and migraines. Too much caffeine can give you headaches. Caffeine has some dangerous effects that may affect your heath.† Site: www.healthline.com and www.mindbodyandgreen.com IS caffeine an addictive drug, and should it be regulated? â€Å"Caffeine is defined as a drug because it stimulates the central nervous system causing increased alertness. Caffeine gives most people a temporarily energy boost and elevates mood.† Kidshealth.org/in/ teens/caffeine.html †¢ How does caffeineRead MoreReforming Marijuana: Marijuana Should Be Legalized792 Words   |  3 Pagesâ€Å"Marijuana† the first thing that comes into the mind is that its a drug which is illegal. Some people believe that the only use of marijuana plant is that it can get you high, which isnt true. The Marijuana, cannabis, or hemp plant is one of the oldest psychoactive plants known to man. Many people fail to realize that marijuana has a history of more than 8000 years and it has only been illegal for a short period of time. Its history dates back as far as 6000 B.C , when cannabis seeds were used as food inRead MoreUsing Vaporizing Pens Are Becoming A Very Popular Trend Essay1330 Words   |  6 Pagescannabinoids could lead to environmental and passive contamination.† People can mix in synthetic marijuana into e-liquids and can be inhaled through a pen-sized vaporizer. Not only can people smoke cannabis out of vaporizer pens, they can also smoke psychoactive drugs such as, methamphetamine, cocaine, heroin, or bath salts (cathinones). According to Paul Tchounwou (2015), â€Å"Very recently, drug users have discovered a method of adapting e-cigs to vaporize a potent hallucinogen known as dimethyltrptamineRead MoreWhat Are The Seven New Dangerous Drugs1621 Words   |  7 PagesThe United Nations Office on Drugs and Crime (UNODC) recently revealed that new psychoactive substances are emerging in the market in terms of both quantity and diversity. However, the paucity of data on the harmfulness and prevalence of these substances offer a challenge in facilitating risk assessment at the international level. Here are the seven new dangerous drugs that are gaining traction and notoriety: Acetylfentanyl Acetylfentanyl is a derivative of fentanyl. It has been used as a substitute

Thursday, December 19, 2019

The Excavation and Discovery of Tutankhamuns Tomb Essay

The excavation and discovery of Tutankhamun’s tomb was as a result of the efforts of the Archaeologist Howard Carter and his team. Carter’s discovery of the tomb came by finding steps to the burial near the entrance to the tomb Ramses VI. The subsequent excavated of the site by Carter and his team revealed the greatest ever treasure found from an Egyptian tomb and showed the existence of Tutankhamun. Carter’s methodology for the excavation was that of maintaining records for each artefact and that every artefact that was brought out of the tomb was preserved appropriately. The discovery and excavation of the tomb was a long and complex process but with it revealed much about Tutankhamun. Carter’s discovery of the tomb came by finding steps†¦show more content†¦This approach to the opening of the chamber demonstrates Carter’s caution that he took into the excavation of Tutankhamun’s tomb and the transportation of the contents that was inside it. Carter opened the burial chamber and when he did he was confronted by the golden walls and two large statues â€Å"So enormous was this structure (17 feet by 11 feet, and 9 feet high, we found out afterwards) that it filled within a little the entire area of the chamber† gives an accurate description of these statues and an accurate account of the amount of artefacts that were found in Tutankhamun’s tomb. Carter’s methodology for the excavation was that of maintaining records for each artefact and that every artefact that was brought out of the tomb was preserved appropriately. Carter methodology involved the referencing of every item found, where it was found in the tomb, preservation of the item and its conservation. Photographs were also taken of the artefactsShow MoreRelatedEssay on King Tut991 Words   |  4 Pagespharaoh today because of the discovery of his tomb and his treasures. King Tut’s tomb was a major discovery of the 19th century. It was a phenomenal discovery that made headlines across the world. Up until the discovery of King Tut’s tomb, it was believed that all royal tombs had been robbed and drained of their treasure. The Discovery Tutankhamuns tomb was discovered in the Valley of the Kings KV62 on November 4, 1922 by the British Egyptologist Howard Carter. The Tomb was discovered near theRead MoreExplain the Archaeological/Written Evidence of the Uniqueness of Tutankhamun’s Tomb in the Eighteenth Dynasty.1264 Words   |  6 Pagesof Tutankhamun’s tomb in the Eighteenth Dynasty. Tutankhamun was an Eighteenth Dynasty pharaoh whose legacy extends to the present, and currently one of the best-known ancient Egyptians of all-time. The â€Å"Boy King† inherited the throne at the age of nine, his reign lasting only ten years before his sudden unexpected death. The traditional burial customs and funeral processions were carried out upon him, but the tomb he was laid to rest in was unique from the typical Eighteenth Dynasty tombs characterisedRead MoreThe Fascination Regarding the Mummys Curse705 Words   |  3 PagesIn 1922, Howard Carter opened the Tomb of Tutankhamun and sparked a wave of popular and scholarly interest in Egyptology. After the Carter discovery, a team of archaeologists and their assistants arrived for the proper dig. Although Carter fared fine, six of the 26 members of the subsequent dig died within a decade of their participation in the endeavor. The leader of the archaeological expedition, Lord Carnaveron, died of blood poisoning. Becaus e quite a few of the team members died within a relativelyRead MoreWhat Was Known About The Site Before Its Discovery?1388 Words   |  6 Pages†¢ What was known about the site before its discovery? Before the first known recording of Ur by Pietro Della Valle in 1625, there wasn’t much known about the site. It wasn’t until the early 1850’s that it was officially identified as the site of Ur which was due to the discovery of the Ziggurat of Ur by John George Taylor . The remains of the Ziggurat were first described by William Kennett Loftus, a Geologist and archaeologist from Newcastle, in the early 19th century. †¢ How it was discovered andRead MoreThe Excavation Of King Tut s Tomb951 Words   |  4 Pagesknowledge about the world of the past is opened. The Colosseum built under the reign of Emperor Vespasian of Rome and the Gà ¶bekli Tepe of the Neolithic Era prevail as one of the most extraordinary structures of the ancient world (#). The excavation of King Tut’s tomb further unveils valuable information about life in ancient Egypt. An architectural structure like the Colosseum reflects the values and cultures of the ancient Roman civilization. This freestanding elliptical amphitheater has the capacityRead MoreControversial Issues in Archaelogy1011 Words   |  4 Pagesin museums. While the field of archaeology is exciting, and the idea of partaking in perilous adventures may seem alluring, the archaeologist was depicted in an incorrect manner. An archaeologist is someone who studies human history through the excavation of sites and the examination of artifacts. Archaeologis ts study the past to learn more about the lives and cultures of people before. The science of archaeology is a relatively new and quickly growing field; yet, as expected with science, numerousRead MoreEssay on Miol2911 Words   |  12 Pages25/3 HISTORY, ARCHAEOLOGY AND SCIENCE Term 2: Monday 29/4/13 – Friday 28/6/13 Week 1 Week 2 Week 3 29/4 6/5 Week 10 1/4 8/4 TUTANKHAMUN’S TOMB TASK 1 Week 4 Week 5 Week 6 Week 7 Week 8 Week 9 20/5 13/5 Week 11 27/5 3/6 10/6 17/6 24/6 TASK 2 HOMER AND THE TROJAN WAR TUT’S TOMB THERA Task Term 3: Monday 15/7/13 – Friday 20/9/13 Week 1 Week 2 Week 3 15/7 22/7 29/7 Week 4 Week 5 Week 6 Week 7 Read MoreTomb 10A1957 Words   |  8 PagesTomb 10A was discovered near the Nile River in a region known as Deir el-Bersha (The Secrets of Tomb 10A: Egypt 2000 BC 2009). It is the 4,000 year old resting place of a governor and his wife, both of whom ruled during the 11th or 12th dynasty and are named Djehutynakht. After the tomb was excavated in 1915 by archaeologists from Harvard University and the Museum of Fine Arts in Boston (MFA), it was clear that what they had found was a consummate archetype of traditional Egyptian burial practices